Need More Powerful Analytics?

Analytics is a necessary part of any online marketing campaign, right? Of course it is. And as the online marketing industry grows, so should the level of sophistication in which we analyze our data. I’m certainly guilty of relying on what I’ll refer to as “status quo” metrics, meaning; I’m only paying attention to data that I’ve always considered to be important…not much else.

I was recently enlightened by a long-time friend and business associate who I believe has a truly unique approach to mining useful data and presenting eye-opening questions that have not been asked previously. The company is called DatabaseDNA and while it’s evident that this is not a web design or marketing firm; the nuts & bolts of what they actually provide is fascinating. One of the company’s owners, Tom Kapurch, has graciously offered to take on a few “pro bono” projects just to show the world what DatabaseDNA is capable of so we took the bait. And so can you, if you’re interested.

But let’s hear it straight from the horses mouth, shall we? I asked Tom for his description of DatabaseDNA and here’s what he had to say…

A better way of determining “what is important to know.”

Webster’s defines the word intelligence as the ability to learn … or deal with new or trying situations, or reason … and the skilled use of reason (and) the ability to apply knowledge to manipulate one’s environment or to think abstractly.

You won’t find a strict definition of business intelligence in Webster’s but when you search the term on the internet you will be directed to a variety of very sophisticated product sites powered by Microsoft, IBM, Cognos and SAS, to name a few.

A review of their products and services will offer terms such as analytics, dashboards, scorecards, data mining, corporate performance management (CPM) and predictive analysis. And, as you search the resources of many companies you will learn many of their collective human resources reflect expertise with these systems. But … do they necessarily have the capability or experience to provide real intelligence or the capacity to provide the abstract knowledge hidden within the data and present these as actionable information?

To the best of our knowledge, our service provides the most unique analytical approach to business intelligence development. It relies on combined technology applications used in government intelligence traffic analysis, consumer and B2B marketing research, operations research and statistical quality control. The related SW program is designed to effectively integrate with any legacy or even desk top system.

With knowledge gained through patterns we call “information emergence” and trends that rely on a unique data measurement and metric development algorithm that goes beyond ‘static,’ conventional statistics, our process uses an experimental AND exploratory method for data mining and “on the fly” analytics. We further provide a highly visual output, whose displays lend to distributed cognitive understanding and consequent tasking in the decision-making process.

One of the most salient features of our process is its dependence on the effective identification of a ‘mid’ or ‘operational level’ of information (between a level of strategy and tactics) with an objective ‘categorization’ of data at this mid level.

This critical elements in this process to optimize decision-making at multiple, integrated management levels to:

1. Reduce dependence on management’s (often times) faulty perception of specific information’s value and relevance,
2. Provide improved specifications for information management and data collection and storage rules, and
3. Spread and reduces risk across key decision nodes at multiple levels of business management.

Our analytics process is not designed to replace legacy HW and SW systems that do an effective job of collecting, storing and distributing large volumes of data.

It is an effective tool to improve the use of these resources to gain a better understanding of “what is important to know.”

So what does that really mean? In short, it means that you can give these guys data of any type and they can tell you things about it that you never knew. I’m not really able to share the capacity in which we used DatabaseDNA, but I can tell you that we were deeply enlightened in a few areas.

And as I mentioned above, these guys are taking on a few LinkWorth-referred projects for nothing in return other than, perhaps, some linkage and honest recommendations. Contact Tom and he’ll answer any questions you might have.